The Real Value of a Liberal Arts Foundation

Dear Families and Friends,

“Education without liberal arts is a threat to humanity.” These are the words of Dr. Santa J. Ono, President of the University of British Columbia and a medical biologist.

Last month, CBC’s “Ideas in the Afternoon” ran a feature on Dr. Ono who makes a compelling case that in an age of rapid technological change, having a liberal arts foundation is more important than ever. It is what nurtures our ability to think imaginatively, to be empathetic, and to have a clear moral compass. “I believe that I am a better scholar because of my liberal arts education, because it was intentionally diverse… it broadened my mind, it exercised my mind.”

In many ways, Dr. Ono could have been speaking about Waldorf education, which not only aims to educate the mind, but also the heart. Whether it’s through the lens of history, geography, math, physics, chemistry, music or the visual and performing arts, our students learn about the world as a way to learn about themselves and what it is to be a free, creative, multi-dimensional human being.

You can hear the full segment of Ideas with Dr. Ono by clicking here.

Class 7 Handwork: Kootenay wildlife?

Handwork gives students opportunities to learn how to take an idea from concept to reality, whether it’s creating a recorder case in Class 1 or using a sewing machine to produce pyjamas in Class 8.

These soft animal sculptures were designed and sewn by three class seven students. The students brainstormed possible subjects, drew their animal from several perspectives, experimented with paper prototypes, created their patterns, and chose their own materials. Not only do the students practise planning and problem-solving skills, they also learn to be flexible and patient. Another engaging way of meeting the BC Applied Design and Technology curriculum requirements!

Best wishes, Phil Fertey